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How do Smart Pills Really Work?

26 January 2019

How do Smart Pills really work?

 

By Erik Bredemeyer

 

What if you could simply take a pill that would instantly make you more intelligent? One that would enhance your cognitive capabilities including attention, memory, focus, motivation and other higher executive functions? If you have ever seen the movie Limitless, you have an idea of what this would look like—albeit the exaggerated Hollywood version. The movie may be fictional but the reality may not be too far behind.

 

So what Are Brain Pills & Nootropics?

 

The concept of neuroenhancement and the use of substances to improve cognitive functioning in healthy individuals, is certainly not a new one. In fact, one of the first cognitive enhancement drugs, Piracetam, was developed over fifty years ago by psychologist and chemist C.C. Giurgea. Although he did not know the exact mechanism, Giurgia believed the drug boosted brain power and so began his exploration into “smart pills“, or nootropics, a term he coined from the Greek nous, meaning “mind,” and trepein, meaning “to bend.

 

Listed below is a brief overview of some of the more frequently used nootropics including wakefulness-promoting agents such as modafinil, and several in the racetam class of drugs, grouped together because of their shared chemical structure. Note that these are not comprehensive descriptions. Those can be found in sources cited.

 

Piracetam:

The so-called “original smart pill,” Piracetam has been shown in studies to significantly improve cognitive and working memory at all levels. Developed in 1964, it is one of the more researched nootropics in the racetam class of supplements. Piracetam is not approved for use as a medical drug or dietary supplement in the U.S.

 

Aniracetam:

A synthetic derivative of Piracetam, aniracetam is believed to be the second most widely used nootropic in the Racetam family, popular for its stimulatory effects because it enters the bloodstream quickly. Initially developed for memory and learning, many anecdotal reports also claim that it increases creativity. However, clinical studies show no effect on the cognitive functioning of healthy adult mice.

 

Oxiracetam:

Popular among computer programmers, oxiracetam, another racetam, has been shown to be effective in recovery from neurological trauma and improvement to long-term memory. It is believed to effective in improving attention span, memory, learning capacity, focus, sensory perception, and logical thinking. It also acts as a stimulant, increasing mental energy, alertness, and motivation.

 

Modafinil:

Modafinil, sold under the name Provigil, is a stimulant that some have dubbed the “genius pill.” It is a wakefulness-promoting agent (modafinil) and glutamate activators (ampakine). Originally developed as a treatment for narcolepsy and other sleep disorders, physicians are now prescribing it “off-label” to cellists, judges, airline pilots, and scientists to enhance attention, memory and learning. According to Scientific American, “scientific efforts over the past century [to boost intelligence] have revealed a few promising chemicals, but only modafinil has passed rigorous tests of cognitive enhancement.” A stimulant, it is a controlled substance with limited availability in the U.S.

 

Ginsenoside Rg1:

Ginsenoside Rg1, a molecule found in the plant genus panax (ginseng), is being increasingly researched as an effect nootropic. Its cognitive benefits including increasing learning ability and memory acquisition, and accelerating neural development. It targets mainly the NMDA receptors and nitric oxide synthase, which both play important roles in personal and emotional intelligence. The authors of the study cited above, say that their research findings thus far have boosted their confidence in a “bright future of cognitive drug development.”

 

So what are you waiting for? Go ahead and order your product today!

 


 

Comments

10 responses to “How do Smart Pills Really Work?”

  1. GinaO says:

    Good Nootropic review, great information. We use Modafil for alertness in patients with brain injury and I heard that some students also use it for some academic purposes but never heard of most of the Racetam class of drugs you mentioned. That is really interesting to know. Do you know  by any means if this could be of help to patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease?

    Thanks for sharing. 

    • admin says:

      Although the science is still not sure how Modafinil really works, I can tell you from my own personal experience that Modafinil works wonders on me. I have had some family members in my family deal with the horrible effects of having Alzheimer’s! I have been using Modafinil along with some other herbal nootropics now since 2016 and my mind feels younger and sharper than ever! I think these medicine and nootropics can offer some good benefits for dementia and or Alzheimer! 

  2. Anthony Hu says:

    Dear Erik,

    Thanks for the informative post on Brain Pills. I am at the age with difficult to remember things. I certainly like to try the product. Which one is the best for age related memory loss?

    When I see your article title “… Brain Pills …”, I feel they are pills for crazy people. I prefer to call them “Smart Pills” or “Genius Pills”. With these names, people are likely to purchase them since it make people smart.

    I will let you know the outcome after I take your suggested smart pills.

    Regards

    Anthony

    • admin says:

      Hello Anthony, I agree with you that words like Smart Pills sound much better than “Brain Pills” thank you for pointing that out. I refer often to the latest news articles about brain supplements and often these companies use the terminology “brain pills” more often than I like it. 

  3. Favour says:

    Neuro enhancement is gaining more consideration as of late. I think Aniracetam is increasingly getting more famous among the nootropic users because of its capacity to enhance cognizance and diminish uneasiness. I would love to know, to what extent does Aniracetam stays in the body and does it has any reaction?

    • admin says:

      Hi and thank you for your question! Aniracetam usually doesn’t last long, it stays in your body for only a few hours (maybe 3-4 hours tops) and is safe to use!

  4. Lok Which says:

    I never knew one can take pills to make himself more intelligent not until I read this post. Thanks for sharing this informative and educative article. This is an information everyone must read because I know there are lot of people that are ignorant of this. My question can one take this nootropic drugs without doctor’s prescription?.

    • admin says:

      Hi Lok, thank you for reading my articles! You won’t get smarter or more intelligent by just taking brain supplements but when you take certain brain products, you will feel more energetic and alert and more focused. I think the biggest change I always notice in myself after I take brain supplements in the morning is that I get more work done, I feel more alert and focused and mentally I feel like I am on top of everything, I definitely feel sharper! 

  5. Hi Erik,
    I guess like a lot of folks, I started out taking a lot of the isolated Brain supplements Individually. After a while that got a little expensive so I’ve been taking Qualia for about two years now and I’m sticking with it for the time being. I think it’s the best bang for the buck !

    Gary/maxcash

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